Tag: Radio pieces on immigration reform

Radio

Reporter’s Notebook: Finding Common Ground on Immigration in Arizona’s Dairy Farms

Phoenix-based FI2W reporter Valeria Fernández produced a radio piece for NPR’s Latino USA on immigrants who work in the dairy industry and the farmers who hire them.

Here, Valeria narrates how she produced the piece, which airs this weekend on Latino USA. To listen to the piece, press “play” below.

[audio:http://latinousa.kut.org/wp-content/lusaaudio/859segAZdairies.mp3]

 

By Valeria Fernández, FI2W contributor

For almost two years now, one of my sources here in Arizona had insisted that I do a story about immigrants working in dairies. I finally started to work on this one about five months ago, before I even knew which direction it was going to take, or even that it was going to become a radio piece. I needed to become familiar with the universe of dairies at a time when Arizona was facing an intense crackdown on illegal immigration.

There was naturally going to be fear and resistance on the part of immigrant workers. For about two years now, the state has had a law in place that sanctions companies who knowingly hire undocumented labor.

Cows in Gerald Lunts farm: he says than other than the economy and the price of milk, finding workers to help in his farm is his biggest problem. (Photo: Valeria Fernández)

Farmer Gerald Lunt says than “other than the economy and the price of milk,” finding workers is his biggest problem. (Photos: V. Fernández – Click to see more)

ALSO: Read a diary by the daughter of a Mexican immigrant dairy worker.

The law has been used mostly to conduct work-site raids in businesses, resulting in the arrest of a couple of hundred workers. The number is not large, but the chilling effect on local immigrant communities is much bigger.

In a couple of ways, this was unexplored territory for me. I was as nervous as the subjects of the story. Not only was I going to leave the comfort of print, but also, I was going to do it in English, my second language. I feared leaving my small notepad and using a microphone instead. Often times I would just tuck it away, and listen to people to help them relax.

There have been stories about workers in agriculture, but I wanted to do a story about what life was like in the dairies. I had all sorts of preconceptions.

(more…)

Radio

“My Life in an Arizona Dairy”: Journal of a Migrant Worker’s Daughter

This diary was written by the 12-year-old daughter of a Mexican immigrant dairy worker. Her name has been changed to protect her identity. Click here to go to the main story to read more about her family and to listen to a radio piece about immigrants and dairy farmers by FI2W‘s Valeria Fernández for NPR’s Latino USA.

Well, my name is Laura. I was born in Arizona and lived here for about a year or so when I moved to the dairy. So I’ve been living here for most of my life.

I live here with my mom, and dad, my two brothers and my little sister. It can be fun and boring living in a dairy.

For the first part, I don’t like living here ’cause the smell!! Yes, there’s times when it smells really awful. And times you can really smell nothing.

Also most the time there’s nothing to do! Well, like, there’s not much trailers here, only like 5! Also there’s not much kids my age around here.

Then sometimes I am really bored and can’t just walk to a friend’s house or something: it’s too far! So I might feel left out most of the time.

Now, the thing I do kinda like is that you can take a walk and see the cows; now I think that’s pretty fun to walk around. Also there’s a lot of open space here! In most houses there’s not a lot of space.

So here you can have a party and barbecue. Okay, so that’s partly most of my life. I’m mostly used to it, so I don’t mind much.

I hope my dad doesn’t lose his job and (we) live here for a couple more years or so. And I hope for those people that don’t want Mexicans here to think it over, ’cause Mexicans have done a big difference to this country to make it a better place.

Radio

Immigration Reform Postponed ’till 2010: FI2W’s Diego Graglia on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show

Following President Barack Obama’s announcement postponing Congressional action on immigration reform until next year and the outcry from immigration activists, Feet in 2 Worlds web editor Diego Graglia appeared Monday on The Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC, New York Public Radio, to discuss the situation.

Also featured was Amy Gottlieb, director of the Immigrant Rights Program at the American Friends Service Committee, who talked about problems with the immigration detention system.

You can listen to the segment here or visit the show’s page.

[audio:http://audio.wnyc.org/bl/bl081709dpod.mp3]
Radio

Feet in Two Worlds Town Hall Focuses on Proposed Immigration Bill in Washington

At a May 24, 2007, event, Same News Different Views, Bridging the Gap Between Ethnic and Mainstream Media, co-sponsored by the Center for New York City Affairs and WNYC, New York Public Radio, leading ethnic and mainstream media journalists brought new perspectives to the immigration policy debate in Washington.

You can listen to the radio broadcast of the town hall on WNYC’s website or you can press play for the two segments below.

[audio:http://audio.wnyc.org/bl/bl052507a.mp3] [audio:http://audio.wnyc.org/bl/bl052507b.mp3] More than 200 journalists, community organizers and members of the public attended the event hosted by WNYC’s Brian Lehrer.

Speakers included: Alberto Vourvoulias-Bush, executive editor of El Diario/LA PRENSA; Sree Sreenivasan, dean of students at Columbia Journalism School, tech reporter for WNBC-TV and co-founder of the South Asian Journalists Association (SAJA); Ti-Hua Chang, reporter for WCBS-TV; and Elaine Rivera, reporter for WNYC; Julia Preston, national immigration reporter for the New York Times; Roberto Lovato, writer for New America Media; Leon Wynter, writer and author of American Skin: Big Business, Pop Culture and the End of White America; and Muzaffar Chishti, director of the Migration Policy Institute’s office at the NYU School of Law.